Tanak Foundations-Concepts in Leviticus-Part 7

When more than one kind of korban was presented (Num 7.16-17) the procedure was usually as follows: the sin offering (chatat) or guilt offering (asham); the burnt offering (olah); the peace offering (shelem) and the grain offering (minchah). This sequence furnishes part of the spiritual significance of the korban system. First, sin had to be dealt with (sin and guilt offering). Second, the worshiper committed himself completely to God (burnt and grain offering). Third, fellowship between the Lord and the worshiper in a covenantal meal, and the renewal of the covenant at Sinai had to be reestablished (peace offering).

Now we are going to talk about the procedures for the animal offerings. We will give the type of korban, its classification as “kodshai kodeshim” (“most holy” and eaten within the Temple/Mishkan) or “kodshai kelim” (“holy” and eaten within the camp), how the blood was applied, what was done with the meat and whether it was eaten or not.

The first one is the inner chatat offering of Yom Kippur. It is kodshai kodeshim and killed north of the altar. The blood is applied in the Kodesh ha Kodeshim (Holy of Holies), the ha Kodesh (Holy Place) and the inner altar of incense by the dabbing of a finger. It is burned outside the camp and it is not eaten (Lev 16). Next we have another inner chatat (Lev 4). It is kodshai kodeshim and killed north of the altar. The blood is applied in the Ha Kodesh (and the inner altar. Sprinkling is done with the finger and it is burned outside the camp and is not eaten.

Next we have the outer chatat, which is kodshai kodeshim and killed north of the altar. The blood is applied on the horns of the altar by the finger. It is eaten by the kohanim (priests) in the azarah (courtyard) for one day and a night. The elevation offering (Lev 1) is kodshai kodeshim and killed north of the altar. The blood is applied on the lower part of the northeast and southwest corners of the outer altar. The blood as applied by “throwing.” It is eaten by male kohanim in the courtyard within one day and a night.

The Korban Asham is kodshai kodeshim and killed north of the altar. The blood is applied at the lower part of the northeast and southwest corners of the altar by throwing. It is eaten by male kohanim in the azarah (courtyard) within the one day and a night. The personal Korban Shelem (Lev 3) is kodshai kelim (holy) and killed anywhere in the azarah (courtyard). The blood is applied at the lower part of the northeast and southwest corners of the altar by throwing. The breast and thigh is eaten by the kohanim and their households and eaten within the camp within one day and a night.

The Korban Todah (Thanksgiving) is kodshai kelim and killed anywhere in the azarah. The blood is applied at the lower part of the corners of the outer altar by throwing. The breast and thigh is eaten by the kohanim and their households and it is eaten anywhere within the camp in one day and a night. The Korban Bechor (Firstborn) is kodshai kelim (Num 18.17-18) and killed anywhere in the azarah. The blood is applied at the lower part of the altar wall by pouring. It is eaten by the kohanim and their households anywhere within the camp in two days and an intervening night.

The Ma’aser of animals (Tithe) is kodshai kelim (Lev 27.32) and is killed anywhere in the azarah. The blood is sprinkled on the lower part of the altar wall by pouring. It is eaten by anyone anywhere in the camp in two days and an intervening night. The Pesach (Passover) is kodshai kelim (Exo 12) and killed anywhere in the azarah. The blood is applied to the lower part of the altar wall by pouring. It is eaten by by anyone who is eligible and registered anywhere in the camp the day it is slaughtered until midnight. Now we are going to discuss the circumstances that call for an animal korban and some further details on each one.

The age of a lamb must be from the eighth day after birth until its first birthday; a kid from the eighth day until the first birthday; a calf from the eighth day to the second birthday; a ram from the beginning of the fourth month until the second birthday; a bull from the first birthday until the third birthday; a goat from the eighth day until the second birthday; and cattle from the eighth day to the third birthday.

The inner Korban Chatat is given as a communal offering on Yom Kippur (male kid); the High Priest on Yom Kippur (bull); a bull for a matter that was hidden from the congregation; a sin offering for communal idolatry (male kid); a bull for the anointed priest (bull). The outer Korban Chatat is given on the mussaf (additional) for Rosh Chodesh (New Moon); the three pilgrim festivals called the Shelosh Regalim, Rosh Ha Shannah and Yom KIppur (male kid); with the two loaves on Shavuot called the Sh’tai Ha Lechem (male kid); personal sin and variable chatat for personal idolatry (female kid); the he-goat of a ruler (male kid); a clean Nazir or Metzora (leper) is a female lamb.

The Korban Olah and elevation offering at the Tamid service is one male lamb in the morning and one male lamb in the evening. The mussaf (additional) of the Sabbath would be two male lambs; the mussaf of Rosh Chodesh, the seven days of Unleavened Bread and Shavuot is two bulls, one ram and seven lambs. The mussaf for Rosh Ha Shannah and Yom Kippur is one bull, one ram and seven lambs. The mussaf for Sukkot on days one through seven is 13 bulls on the first day, going down one bull daily to seven bulls, two rams and 14 lambs. The mussaf for Shemini Atzeret (eighth day of Sukkot) is one bull, one ram and seven lambs. With the Omer there will be one lamb. With the two loaves at Shavuot is one bull, two rams and seven lambs. The mussaf for the High Priest on Yom Kippur is one ram and on the three pilgrim festivals it is from the sheep, goats or cattle. All of these korbanot are males.

The Olah (burnt) for a woman after childbirth, a Nazir and a Metzora is a male lamb; for communal idolatry a bull; for a convert a male sheep, goat or cattle. A Korban Asham for a doubtful sin, theft, betrothed maidservant is a male ram. For a clean Nazir and a Metzora it was a male lamb. The Korban Shelem with the two loaves at Shavuot was two male lambs; for the Chagigah and Simchah on the three pilgrim festivals it was a male or female sheep, goat or cattle. For the clean Nazir it was a male ram. A voluntary shelem was a male or female sheep, goat or cattle. The Todah Shelem (Thanksgiving) was a male or female sheep, goat or cattle. The Olah for the Firstborn was a male sheep, goat or cattle. For the tithe it was a male or female sheep, goat or cattle and the Passover was a male lamb or kid.

In Part 8 we will pick up with the bird offerings.

Posted in All Teachings, Articles, Idioms, Phrases and Concepts, Prophecy/Eschatology, The Feasts of the Lord, The Tanach, Understanding the New Testament

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*