Temple 201-The Ceremonies (Yom Kippur)-Part 31

We will conclude the Yom Kippur ceremony, beginning with Yoma 7.1.

7.1…Then the High Priest came to read (In the Lishkat ha Nashim, or Court of the Women). If he was minded to read in the linen garments (of a priest) he could do so; otherwise he would read in his own white vestment. The minister of the synagogue (in the Temple) used to take a scroll of the Law and give it to the chief of the synagogue, and the chief of the synagogue gave it to the Prefect (the Sagan, deputy High Priest), and the Prefect gave it to the High Priest, and the High Priest received it standing and read it standing. And after he read “After the death” (Lev 16) and “Howbeit on the tenth day” (Lev 23.26-32), then he used to roll up the scroll of the Law and put it in his bosom (under his arm) and say, “More is written here than I have read out before you”. “And on the tenth” (Num 29.7-11) which is in the Book of Numbers, he recited by heart. Thereupon he pronounced the 18 Benedictions (the Amidah or Shemoneh Esrai): for the Law, for the Temple Service, for the Thanksgiving, for the Forgiveness of Sin, and for the Temple separately, and for the Israelites separately, and for the priests separately and for the rest a general prayer.

7.2…He that can see the High Priest when he reads cannot see the bullock and the he-goat that are being burnt; and he that can see the bullock and the he-goat that are being burnt (in the Place of Burning outside the Damascus Gate, very near where Yeshua was crucified) cannot see the High Priest when he reads; not that it was not permitted, but because the distance apart was great and both acts were performed at the same time.

7.3…If he read in the linen vestments, he afterward sanctified his hands and his feet, stripped off his clothes, went down and immersed himself, and came up and dried himself. They brought to him the vestments of gold, and he put them on and sanctified his hands and his feet (the kedusha is changing) and went out and offered his ram and the ram of the people and the seven unblemished lambs of a year old. So R. Eliezer (the believer). R. Akiba (during the third Jewish revolt is 132-135 AD, he declared Bar Kochba the Messiah) says: They offered these with the morning Daily Whole Offering (the Tamid), and the bullock for the Whole Offering (an Olah) and the he-goat that is offered outside were offered with the afternoon Daily Whole Offering (Tamid).

7.4…He then sanctified his hands and his feet, stripped off his clothes, went down and immersed himself, and came up and dried himself. They brought to him the white vestments, and he put them on and sanctified his hands and his feet. He then went in to bring out the ladle (censor) and the fire-pan. He sanctified his hands and his feet, stripped off his clothes, went down and immersed himself, came up and dries himself; and they brought to him the golden vestments; and he put them on and sanctified his hands and his feet, and went in to burn the afternoon incense (Exo 30.8) and trim the lamps (of the Menorah). He sanctified his hands and his feet and stripped off his clothes. Then they brought him his own raiment and he put them on. And they went with him to his house. And he made a feast for his friends for that he was come forth safely from the Sanctuary.

7.5…The High Priest ministers in eight pieces of raiment, and a common priest in four-in tunic, drawers, turban and girdle. To these the High Priest adds the breastplate, the apron, the upper garment and the frontlet (with “Kodesh L’YHVH” written across the front). In these were the Urim (“lights”) and Thummim (“perfections”) inquired of; and they were not inquired of for a common person, but only for the king, for the Court (Sanhedrin), or for one of whom the congregation had need.

This ends the ceremony of Yom Kippur, but there is a prophetic significance of some of the things happening. This ceremony clearly teaches the second coming of Yeshua on Yom Kippur. In this teaching, we are mainly looking at the ceremonies of Yom Kippur. For more information about the prophetic aspects of the festival, go to our Prophecy/ Eschatology and Feasts of the Lord site on the menu.

In Part 32, we will begin with the ceremonies at the festival of Sukkot. We will also get into the relationship of Yeshua and Sukkot, and then into a more detailed look at the birth of Yeshua at Sukkot.

Posted in Articles, Idioms, Phrases and Concepts, Prophecy/Eschatology, The Feasts of the Lord, The Tanach, The Temple

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